Picture-In-Picture

The picture-in-picture feature on our televisions, computers and smartphones allow us to view more than one “channel” or “window” at a time. Typically, you have your main program running on the big screen and off in one of the corners you have another screen streaming something else. At times, the little window in the corner distracts us from what is happening in the big picture, and we miss what is happening.

This past week while I was reading Paul’s letter to Titus, I was distracted by some thoughts that pulled me away from the bigger picture of what Paul was trying to communicate. The first two verses of chapter 3, particularly the opening words captured my attention and preoccupied my mind for some time. Here are the words, 

“Remind the people to be subject to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready to do whatever is good, to slander no one, to be peaceable and considerate, and always to be gentle toward everyone.” (Titus 3:1-2)

Still fresh in the minds of many are the orders given to us by our governing authorities in response to the recent pandemic. Personally, I did my best to live within the confines of the instructions given. While there were many different opinions and choices made during that time, I felt convicted to live and act in a way that was honoring to the words of scripture and to those in authority. 

For a little while I was stuck in a spiral of questions and thoughts trying to understand how we as Christians should live, how “to be subject to” our modern-day rulers and authorities. 

My distractions and focus in one area of life temporarily blinded me from seeing the bigger picture of why I choose to live for Jesus, Paul had much more to say to me through these words.

These two verses (3:1-2) speak volumes into the life that we are live as Christians and ultimately why. Not only is obedience required along with a readiness to do good, but we are also to treat others in a way that builds them up not tear them down, to be peacemakers, to put others before ourselves and to have a gentle spirit toward those around us. 

Why the reminder? What then is the bigger picture? 

The lives we live (as believers) are to reflect who Jesus is so that others will see him through us. Our lives are to point people toward Jesus. We need the reminder because we do get distracted, and when that reflection becomes more about us or the world than it does about Jesus the focus in no longer on the big picture, which is the love of Jesus. The message of the Gospel is Christ’s love for us, communicated through our lives as we live according to God’s word. 

We were never promised that living for Jesus was going to be easy. Distractions, no matter what they are or how they come into our lives have the power to draw our attention away from living up to the words Paul speaks to Titus and you and me.

What is distracting you from experiencing the incredible love of Jesus today? When we live a life for Him, we become a part of the big picture, sharing, and showing the love that he has for all his people. Don’t be a distraction for others, be the picture of Jesus in how you live your life. 

You! Who, Me?

Have you ever had someone single you out in a crowd? It can be an uneasy feeling depending on the circumstance. Oftentimes, this pointed exclamation is followed with a message of accusation or blame. “You”, makes things personal; it narrows the audience of its subsequent words to a single intended subject, you! Whether through spoken or written word, the use of “you” should draw your attention to listen or read carefully as there is a message to follow.

The Apostle Paul uses an emphatic “you” in his letter to Titus that helps us to understand the importance and contrast between living for Jesus and living for the world. Titus chapter 2:1 reads “You, however…” or as some translations might say, “As for you Titus…” must teach what is appropriate to sound doctrine. 

In the last several of verses in chapter 1 Paul talks about the “many rebellious people, full of meaningless talk and deception… by teaching things they must not teach”. This contrast to what is true and faithful to the life of a believer outlines the charge Paul gives to Titus, “to teach what is appropriate” in life in faith. 

Titus was chosen by Paul to lead the charge in teaching or promoting the truth and transformational power of the gospel, to live a life that reflected the correct behaviours and attitudes that would be an inspiration and model for the leaders of the church and ultimately the church itself. 

Paul does not leave Titus empty handed in his given task. The words that follow help identify some of the foundational truths and heart and mind attitudes that will help people separate and protect themselves from the false teachings that were being taught. Speaking to a society distant from how the world defines culture today Paul’s words still stand as good practice in our lives today. 

The central themes of self-control, respect, reverence, love, purity, kindness, and integrity are part of the instruction given to the older men, older women, younger women, younger men, and slaves.  These actions are not just empty directives that only help us live better lives, each speak into a greater purpose and motivation. In the following verses Paul gives us the answer to the question why we should live this way, 

“so that no one will malign the word of God” (2:5); “so that those who oppose you may be ashamed because they have nothing bad to say about us.” (2:8); “so that in every way they will make the teaching about God our Savior attractive.” (2:10)

You might ask, how it is possible to live in a way that truly reflects God while the world around us becomes more resistant to recognizing who he is? Paul reminds us about the incredible grace and salvation God has given to us through the death and resurrection of Jesus. “It teaches us to say” NO” to ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled lives in this present age”. (2:12)

How are YOU, yes YOU, leading the charge to teach or promote the truth and transformational power of the Gospel in your life? My prayer for you, (something I pray for myself) is that you would continually experience the incredible grace of God in your life. “let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven”. (Matthew 5:16)

On Purpose & for a Purpose

The product development team behind the design of the French’s Mustard bottle have done something very much on purpose and for a very specific purpose. You will notice a tiny yet noteworthy feature on the base of the lid, a seemingly insignificant dimple of plastic. This small yet useful feature is there to hold the hinged bottle tip back from messing up the stream of mustard as it is squeezed onto your food. (Go ahead, get up and check it for yourself, your mustard plying experience will never be the same). 

In my last post I shared some thoughts about the confidence Paul had in his role as a servant of God. This Spirit filled confidence gave him a purpose as he lived out God’s will for his life. In the opening words of his letter to Titus he highlights this purpose, 

“…to further the faith of God’s elect and their knowledge of the truth that leads to godliness…” 

If you have been a part of a church, you will likely be familiar with its mission and vision statements. These short yet powerful statements give direction and purpose to the life of the church. With hope and trust in God, everything the church does is to help further the mission and vision laid out before them.

In these opening words to Titus Paul has stated for us his personal mission statement. A personal mission statement defines who you are as a person and identifies your purpose. It explains what you will do to pursue that purpose.

Paul is a man of action, his words “to further the faith of God’s elect”, give us a sense of movement or growth in our faith. The word “further” gives us a picture that he is extending something toward us, leading or guiding us forward down a particular path. That something is the “knowledge of the truth”. Simply stated, the knowledge and truth Paul describes here is hearing and understanding the message of the gospel in a personal and transformational way. 

Paul does not just stop there; he goes on to explain further the purpose of this action. The destination of that path Paul leads us down is a lifelong journey to godliness. If you read on in Paul’s letter to Titus, he begins to break down the appropriate behaviors and responsibilities of those who are involved in leading the church (to be an example for others). His words describe how a life transformed by the gospel should reflect the love of Jesus and his Father in heaven so that others will see him. 

Do you have a personal mission statement for your life? Does it challenge you to take action in your life and the lives of others? Is your mission Christ-centered? What is your goal, your destination in life? What have you learned from Paul’s words?

It is my hope and prayer that these questions and Paul’s words inspire you to think about your mission in life. Pray and ask God to help you know and understand his will for your life. Live life on purpose and for a purpose, let the truth of the gospel be the center of your life on mission with Jesus. 

A Particular kind of Confidence

Confidence in its various forms can be defined either as a feeling or belief that one can rely on something or someone. It can also be used to describe the feeling of certainty about the truth of something. Confidence in oneself can be described as a feeling of self-assurance coming from one’s appreciation of our own abilities or qualities. 

Today I began reading Paul’s letter to Titus and was reminded once again that God reveals himself and his truths to us in incredible ways. As I was reading the opening words, I was struck by the remarkable confidence Paul had in knowing who he was and his role (purpose) in advancing the message of the Gospel. Read his words as he opens the letter and “introduces” himself,  

“…a servant of God and an apostle of Jesus Christ to further the faith of God’s elect and their knowledge of the truth that leads to godliness—in the hope of eternal life, which God, who does not lie, promised before the beginning of time, and which now at his appointed season he has brought to light through the preaching entrusted to me by the command of God our Savior…”

Considering the depth of meaning attached to the word “servant” or “slave” as some translations write, Paul makes a very powerful statement. While our minds tend to think of this position through a negative lens, Paul helps us understand it differently. He is declaring in this letter that he belongs to the Lord, that his life and purpose are to serve the God who created him. Understanding who Jesus is and what he has done for him, Paul put all his trust in him. 

Paul’s words of introduction have made me stop and think about the confidence he had in his faith. Normally I equate Paul with his title of Apostle, one that gives him authority and responsibility in the mission that was entrusted to him. The roots of Paul’s work to advance the message of the gospel go so much deeper than any prescribed role. His life, his work, his passion for God reflects the incredible power of the Holy Spirit through the work of Christ in his life. 

Paul’s confidence, his knowledge and understanding in living for Jesus underscore the hope that he has in the promise of eternal life with his Father in heaven. The same promise given to you and me as we live our lives here and now. Paul’s life should be an inspiration for our lives. 

Can you or I claim to be a servant of God like Paul? Absolutely! We serve the same God as Paul and are afforded the same power and presence of the Holy Spirit in our lives when we place our hope in trust in the message of the Gospel, in our relationship with Jesus. 

For me, Paul’s actions speak louder than the words that he wrote. He lived a hard life as a follower of Jesus. Paul was entrusted with a mission, one that he took with him to the grave. The heart and soul of Paul’s life and writing continue to live on. The confidence he had in the message and reality of the Gospel will carry on for generations to come. 

Today, as I read the opening words of Paul’s letter to Titus, I am thankful for the reminder that we can have confidence in the promises of God. I am thankful for the power of the Gospel message. I pray that through the power of the Holy Spirit I can have the same confidence as Paul to be on mission for Jesus Christ. This is my prayer for you as well.

Refresh

In the furniture refinishing business, the term “refresh” is used to describe the type of work to be done any one piece of furniture. To refresh something, you lightly sand the existing finish before you give it a nice fresh topcoat. To refinish something, you would strip the old finish right off, get down to bare wood and start from scratch. 

In life and in faith when we come to know Jesus as our personal Lord and Saviour, we in a sense “refinish” our lives. We give over to God our old lives and begin a new one, living for Jesus. As we grow in our faith, as we live in a world full of evil and temptation, we need to be refreshed from time to time. 

When the Apostle Paul wrote his letter to Philemon he wrote these words, “Your love has given me great joy and encouragement, because you, brother, have refreshed the hearts of the Lord’s people”. Philemon was a fellow disciple of Jesus and as we read in the opening verses, hosted a gathering of believers (the church) in his home. Paul’s letter describes the incredible love that Philemon had for these people and personally thanks him and encourages him through his words. 

There are three other instances where Paul uses the word “refreshed” in the NT, once again in verse 20 of this letter and in Romans 15:32 and 1 Corinthians 16:18. Paul uses this word to describe the taking of time to break away from our busy lives so that our hearts, minds, and spirit can be refreshed. Refreshed in the sense that we take time to reflect, learn and grow in our relationship with Christ. 

Philemon was a partner with Paul in sharing the good news of the Gospel, to share everything that is good so that his understanding of who Christ is would reflect in his life and love for others. I do believe that as Philemon took the time to read these words from Paul his own heart would have been refreshed.

As believers, many of us set aside an hour or two each week, typically on a Sunday morning to go to church. This time is a break away from the normal routine and busyness of life. We come together to hear God’s word, learning, and growing in our understanding of who he is so that like the people of the church before us our hearts, our minds and our spirit can be refreshed. 

Is once a week for an hour or two in the morning enough to keep you refreshed? NO, we need these moments in our lives every day. So, how might we be refreshed in our hearts, our spirit, and our minds each day? To begin, we all (myself included) need to spend more time in God’s Word and in prayer. These are two of the foundations of our faith, on these things all other things are built. 

Consider how each of the following things can help you refresh your heart, mind, and spirit. Rest in the Lord, simply trust in him. Expect that God will work in and through you. Fear the Lord in reverent awe. Read his Word, a gift given to you. Embrace all that he has given to you, count your blessings. Share his love with others. Help those who need help; serve, and allow yourself to be served. 

When was the last time you took some time to be refreshed? What did that look like for you? How did it feel?” Pray and ask God to lead you into a time of refreshment today.

Let’s Get Personal.

Raise your hand if you have ever been in in church and felt like the pastor was speaking directly to you. Have you ever felt like you are sitting in the “hot seat”? Ever felt like the pastor keeps making eye contact with you, and only you, as he speaks? It’s happened to me, both as a recipient and after giving a message. I have had people come to me and say, “I think that message was written for me.” For whatever reason, the message that day for that person was very personal. 

The apostle Paul wrote several letters to the church in his time, many of course that we have preserved in our Bibles today. The letter that we have to Philemon stands apart from the others because it is a much more personal letter, it is very short and, on the surface, does not seem to contain any big theological teachings. 

This letter has a lot to do with relationships, close personal relationships, and the incredible bond of love (inspired by Christ) that binds them together. Consider for a moment the words that Paul uses to describe Onesimus, He is his child (v.10), his heart (v.12) and his beloved brother (v.16). When he speaks of Philemon, he uses similar words plus regards him as a co-worker (v.1), a partner (v.17) and one who owes him his very life (v.19). 

Much of Paul’s letter to Philemon is written on the foundations and command found in 1 John chapter 4. “We love because he first loved us… Anyone who loves God must also love their brother and sister”. (v.19,21b)

It seems that Philemon was in the “hot seat” as the intended recipient of the letter, but, the introductory verses also read, “the church that meets in your home”. The church as a whole body is included in this plea that Paul writes. While this letter is personal there is a bigger message for us all. 

I like to think that we can all put ourselves in the shoes of the original characters of this letter. Maybe you or I take on the role of Paul as the writer and mentor, maybe as Philemon, the recipient and leader, or as Onesimus as the one seeking to be forgiven and accepted. Maybe you or I are observing from the “sidelines” as someone who is a part of the church. 

No matter who we might be in the letter there is a message here for each of us. A message that bridges the span of time from its first delivery to the minute you and I read these words in your bible today. 

As followers of Christ, we are not alone. In Christ, we become brothers and sisters, we are adopted as sons and daughters into the family of God. Paul outlines some very practical ways for us to act as a family through this letter, putting us all in the “hot seat” as we think about how we personally and corporately live out each of his prescribed actions in our lives. 

How are we loving one another? (vs. 5, 7, 9,16); How are we praying for one another? (vs. 4, 22); How are we partnering or sharing with one another? (vs. 6); How are we being good or showing favor to one another (vs. 6,14); How have we been refreshing (inspiring) each other’s hearts to act and serve in a way that honors God? (vs. 7,12,20)

What question or action will you choose to act on today? Was this message written for you personally? Pray and ask God to lead and guide you out of the “hot seat” and into action. 

What is in your Junk Drawer

I don’t think there is a home in which the “junk drawer” does not exist. Almost everyone I have asked in the past couple of weeks fully admits to having one. This is the one drawer in the house that collects all the seemingly useless items that we don’t really know what to do with. Somewhere in the depths of our minds (and the drawer) we know that the items we place in them will once again find the light of day and be useful again.

Tucked away in the New Testament we have the privilege of reading a short letter to Philemon. It is written by Paul and although it is short in word count, the words that Paul uses are filled with some incredible instruction and truths. Through generations of change (both culturally and in language) I do believe that we miss some of the original craftsmanship that Paul uses to send a message to Philemon (and the church) as instruction for living for Jesus. 

Reading, hearing, and understanding this letter in its original context and language would help us appreciate the bigger picture of Paul’s intent for having Philemon accept Onesimus back into his life and ministry. Consider verse eleven for a moment regarding Onesimus, Paul writes, “Formerly he was useless to you, but now he has become useful both to you and to me.” When you dig a little deeper into what Paul says, you begin to see some interesting connections between the words.

For example, the Greek word for “useless” (achrēstos) sounds like the Greek word achristos which means “without Christ”. The Greek word for “useful” (euchrēstos) sounds like the Greek word for Christ (christos)

Paul skillfully draws for us a connection that speaks directly to the relationship that we have together in Christ. First and foremost, that a relationship with Christ is life changing (useless – without Christ vs. useful – with Christ) and foundational to being on mission for him. Secondly, that relationship is what binds us together as disciples of Christ. 

When Paul says Onesimus in now “useful both to you and to me”, he is referring to the fact that he is now a part of God’s family, a brother in Christ and is a part of the same mission. The message of the gospel, the incredible news of salvation through the death and resurrection of Jesus had become a reality for Onesimus, his life had been transformed, he was adopted into a new family. 

When I read this letter, I can almost feel the excitement behind the words that Paul writes. Paul has gained a new brother in Christ who is ready and willing to do his part to bring the gospel message to others. 

There are times in life when we may feel “useless”, stored away in a “drawer” feeling like we are not being very effective in the work of the Lord. But, when the power of the resurrection is a reality in our lives, we are far from useless. God has a time and place for each of his children to shine, to be used by him for his glory. 

If you are sitting in the “drawer” waiting for the opportunity to be “useful” again, do this: Pray. Pray and ask God to use you for his will and purpose. Be ready, the opportunity will come.

Been There, Done That.

The phrase “been there, done that” is often used to express a person’s complete familiarity with a situation or event. Typically, when this statement is used, it is spoken with a suggestion of sarcasm or a sense of tiredness. For example, if you live on an island as I do, you might think or say “been there, done that” when you consider setting sail on the ferry for the umpteenth time.

A I continue to read Paul’s letter to Titus I came across a couple of verses in chapter three where Paul uses a variation of the statement “been there, done that”. After Paul instructs Titus to remind the people (the church) to be mindful of their attitudes and actions towards leaders in government, to be obedient to ready to serve and do what is good and gentle to everyone around them he says, “At one time”. 

“At one time we too were foolish, disobedient, deceived and enslaved by all kinds of passions and pleasures. We lived in malice and envy, being hated, and hating one another.” (Titus 3:3) In other words, we have all “been there, done that”. 

There are a couple of important reminders for us in this verse and the verses that follow. First, Paul reminds us that we too once walked in the shoes and followed the pathway of worldly practices that kept us separated from God. This first reminder sets us up to recognize the sometimes-negative attitude of “better than” or “holier than thou” way we may act towards those who have not yet experienced the incredible love and grace Jesus has for them. The gentleness we are called to have for everyone in chapter 3:2 can become a little rough around the edges. 

The second reminder we have through these words is what follows in verse 4 of chapter 3. “But when the kindness and love of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of righteous things we had done, but because of his mercy.” 

If there is anything we need to be reminded of daily it is the fact that as believers, we must never forget the means by which we are saved. When Paul speaks of the incredible mercy that came to us through the appearance of our Saviour, he is talking about the birth, the life, the death (sacrifice) and the resurrection of Jesus. 

The kindness and love that is Jesus Christ is available to everyone. His grace and mercy are poured out on each one of us as his followers every single day as we continue to live in a world that temps us and pulls us away from living in obedience and service in Christs name. 

As believers we have answered the call of Jesus to come and follow him. In a sense we have “been there, done that.” Think of this in a more positive light rather than the opening suggestion of sarcasm or tiredness. We have received the greatest gift ever and with that comes purpose, that is what Paul reminds us of here in these verses.

Jesus is kindness and love. Each one of us is created in his image, to reflect who he is so that others may know him. By the power of the Holy Spirit, we have been empowered to move beyond “been there, done that”, we were created to do more. Do you remember the moment you made the choice to follow Jesus? Think back to your “been there, done that” moment and use that experience to inspire others, share your story so that kindness and love (Christ) shines through you.

Sound Advice

How many of these familiar sayings have you heard before? “They returned safe and sound”, or “their business has been built on a sound foundation” or “he/she is sound asleep”. Maybe you have heard something like, “that person likes to sound off their opinions” or “you have a sound understanding on the subject”.  In life, we all benefit from getting sound advice on buying the right investments, vehicles, homes, and making other significant decisions. 

When life and faith come together there is much sound advice that we find in scripture. In his letter to Titus, the apostle Paul talks about sound doctrine, and being sound in our faith.

The word translated as “sound” in verses one and two of chapter 2 in this letter define a sense of “healthiness”, to be healthy or to be correct. Paul’s instruction or command to Titus was this, “You, however, must teach what is appropriate to sound doctrine.” In other words, teach what is healthy and beneficial for those who hear your words. Paul, in an earlier letter to Timothy (1 Timothy 1:11) connects sound doctrine to the incredible truths laid out in the message of the gospel. 

The truth of the Gospel message is the foundation on which every Christ follower must find their feet firmly planted. Paul’s letter to Titus was written to encourage and instruct not just himself but the church of believers. This was a reminder for everyone to live by example, to live differently from the false teachers and the un-believing community they were a part of.  The sound advice given to Titus and the Christian churches in Crete was so much more than just knowledge and understanding of sound doctrine but living it out in their daily lives. 

To be sound in our faith implies that we as Christians understand and live according to the will of God. The promise of the gospel message for all of us is that we will one day be in the presence of our heavenly Father. By the grace of God our salvation is secured for us through the death and resurrection of his son Jesus Christ. 

Skillfully written into this letter given to Titus are references to more than a dozen teachings (doctrines) that help guide us in navigating life and faith in a culture that is seemingly counter-Christian. In many ways when we read the words of these letters to Titus and Timothy, we find ourselves facing much the same cultural influences that continue to distract people from the truths found in God’s word. 

The worldly distractions around us have the potential to deafen our hearts and minds from following this sound advice of living a healthy and productive life for Christ. So, what can we do to protect ourselves? 

First, embrace the truth of the gospel; through Christ’s death and resurrection and by the grace of God we have been brought into his family. 

Second, Pray & read. You and I do not have the power or the strength alone to live as fully devoted followers of Jesus on our own. Through prayer and scripture, we will grow into knowing the Lords will for our lives. 

Third, Live boldly for Jesus. Every day, live a life that sets you apart from the world. Be sound in your faith. 

Wise Investing

In today’s world there are many strategies and options for investing in your future. You can pick from stocks, bonds, mutual funds, bank products, options, annuities, ETFs and more. Within my limited knowledge of investing, I know a little bit about dividend reinvestment plans. They allow the investor to reinvest cash dividends into additional shares of the “parent” stock when dividends are paid out. 

Recently as I was working through a portion of scripture, I was reminded that there is another type of investing that reaches far beyond our desire for “physical” or material gain. While the responsible use of what God provides for us is important, our real investment portfolio should be filled with strategies and options to help equip others with the truth of the Gospel message. 

The book of Titus is a short yet carefully penned letter that the Apostle Paul wrote to Titus as he prepared to minister and lead the people as the church in Crete. There is a real connection between believing in what is right and acting in a manner that shows others what it means to live in the light of truth and godliness. 

Chapter 2 of Titus lays out a different type of reinvestment plan that guides us through a proven strategy for investing in the lives of others, one that makes a lasting impact. 

Paul instructs Titus in chapter 2:2-3 to “Teach the older men to be temperate, worthy of respect, self-controlled, and sound in faith, in love and in endurance. Likewise, teach the older women to be reverent in the way that they live, not be slanderers or addicted to much wine, but to teach what is good.”

Paul’s strategy begins by making an investment of time and energy into teaching “older” men and women to live in a way that first honors God and second sets a good example of living right for those who follow. This first, or initial investment into the lives of the older generation becomes the initial point of re-investment for future generations. 

Paul continues to give instruction in the following verses using terms like, “urge the younger women” and “encourage the young men”. What he does here for the older men and women is this: he sets up the terms of re-investment into the lives of the younger generation. Their learning and growing in temperament, respect, self-control, sound faith, love, endurance, reverence are the dividends that pay forward into the lives of the younger men and women. 

Paul reminds us in verse eleven of chapter two that by the grace of God, salvation is for everyone. While we may live in a different time and space culturally from Paul’s original audience, the truths that these words speak should continue to be a guide to investing into the lives of our younger generations. 

Held in-between these words of instruction to Titus and to us is a message of living out our faith in a way that inspires others. How does your life inspire others? Will people see Jesus in your life through your actions and not just your words? As we live and lead by example it is my hope and prayer that we are all investing into the lives of those who will one day fill our shoes and follow in our footsteps.